University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
 
Black border for page.
History of Science & Technology
History of Science & Technology
University of Minnesota
People Academics Events and Info
The Faculty Courses we offer Colloquia
Our Graduate Students Graduate Programs Newsletter
Contact us Undergraduate Minor Resources
black-pixel.gif (807 bytes)
YOU ARE HERE: people > meet the faculty and staff
ss ss
  Regular Faculty  |  Emeritus Faculty  |  Affiliated Faculty  |  Staff

Jennifer Alexander

Professor Jennifer Alexander


Mechanical Engineering
1100 Mechanical Engineering
0691
(Office: Room 239)
Tel: 612-626-7309
Fax: 612-625-6069 (Mech. Eng.)
Email: jalexand@me.umn.edu
www.me.umn.edu/people/alexander.shtml

Specialties: Technology, modern Germany, comparative industrial cultures

I am a historian of science and technology in modern Europe, specializing in modern industrial culture. My core interest is how people have used technology to make and remake themselves and their environments, and my current project, "Sport and Work," investigates the biomechanics movement of the twentieth century, especially labor and sport physiology during World War II and the Cold War, and how technologies of human performance were transferred between different nations and cultures. Examples include the development of the K-ration at the University of Minnesota, and studies of diet and labor efficiency in labor camp prisoners in Nazi Germany. This project extends a study I have just completed of the history of the concept of efficiency more generally, from its roots in the studies of machine performance during the industrial revolution through its translation into a social value at the turn of the twentieth century. I did my Ph.D. at the University of Washington, and, before coming to Minnesota, was a research fellow of the Centre de recherche en historie des sciences et des techniques, Centre national de la recherche scientifique in Paris.

Selected publications:
The Mantra of Efficiency: From Waterwheel to Social Control (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008).

"Efficiency and Pathology: Mechanical Discipline and Efficient Worker Seating in Germany, 1929-1932," Technology and Culture 47 (2006).

"The Line between Potential and Working machines: César Nicolas Leblanc and Patent Engravings, 1811-1835," History and Technology 15 (1999): 175-212.

"An Efficiency of Scarcity: using food to increase the productivity of Soviet prisoners of war in the coal mines of the Third Reich," History and Technology 22 (2006): 391-406.

"Efficiencies of balance: Technical efficiency, popular efficiency, and arbitrary standards in the early progressive era US," (Social Studies of Science, forthcoming).

Victor Boantza

Professor Victor Boantza

Physics and Astronomy
148 Tate Laboratory of Physics
0331
(Office: Room 354C)
Tel: 612-624-8073
Email: vboantza@umn.edu

HST Director of Undergraduate Studies

Specialties: early modern physical sciences, Enlightenment science, the scientific and chemical revolutions .

I work on the history of early modern science, in particular chemistry, physics, and the experimental sciences from the 17th to the early 19th century. I have an M.A. and Ph.D. in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology from the University of Toronto (2009). I have held postdoctoral fellowships at McGill University and the University of Sydney, where I also received an Australian Research Council Early Career Research Award for a project on science in the Enlightenment. In Matter and Method in the Long Chemical Revolution I trace continuities in matter theory and experimental philosophy from Boyle to Lavoisier, and reevaluate the disciplinary relationship between mechanists, Newtonians, and chemists in France, England, and Scotland. My present project, Elusive Matters: A Historical Ontology of Imponderables from Newton to Davy, explores the changing ontological, epistemological, and experimental underpinnings of light, heat, electricity, fire, and ether as they crossed the borders between diverse scientific, technological, and industrial realms. I am also interested in historiography, science and religion, the philosophy of technology, and the history of scientific instruments. .

Selected publications:
Matter and Method in the Long Chemical Revolution: Laws of Another Order . (Burlington: Ashgate, 2013).

Controversies Within the Scientific Revolution, co-edited with M.Dascal (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2011).

"From Cohesion to Pesanteur: The Origins of the 1669 Debate on the Causes of Gravity," in V. Boantza and M. Dascal (eds), Controversies Within the Scientific Revolution (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2011), 77–100.

"Alkahest and Fire: Debating Matter, Chymistry, and Natural History at the Early Parisian Academy of Sciences," in O. Gal and C. Wolfe (eds), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge: Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science (Dordrecht: Springer, 2010), 75–92.

"The Phlogistic Role of Heat in the Chemical Revolution and Kirwan's 'Ingenious Modifications … into the Theory of Phlogiston.'" Annals of Science, 65 (2008), 309–38.

"Collecting Airs and Ideas: Joseph Priestley's Style of Experimental Reasoning," Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 38 (2007), 506–22.

Mark Borrello

Mark Borrello  

Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
100 Ecology Building
6098
(Office: Room 304)
Tel: 612-624-7079
Fax: 612-624-6777 (EEB)
Email: borrello@umn.edu
www.cbs.umn.edu/eeb/faculty/BorrelloMark

HSTM Director of Graduate Studies

Specialties: History of Biology, evolutionary theory, genetics and ecology, biology of behavior; biology and society

I am a historian of biology with a particular interest in evolutionary theory, genetics, behavior and the environment. My work explores the varied interpretations and applications of evolutionary theory from the late 19th century to the present. My dissertation, Vero Copner Wynne-Edwards and the History of Group Selection Theory, was completed in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at Indiana University (2002). During a post-doctoral teaching fellowship at Michigan's Lyman Briggs School of Science, I taught courses in the history of genetics and evolution, and was co-leader of a study abroad course in Panama on Tropical Biodiversity and Conservation. I am currently examining the connections of group selection to ethology and evolutionary psychology. This research aims to clarify the factors that contributed to the development of the field of ethology and will be part of a book on the group selection controversy I'm writing.

Selected publications:
Evolutionary Restraints: The Contentious History of Group Selection (University of Chicago Press, 2010).

"Synthesis and Selection: Wynne Edwards Challenge to David Lack," Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2003): 531-566.

"Mutual Aid and Animal Dispersion: An Historical Analysis of Alternatives to Darwin," Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2004): 15-31.

"Radicals and Revolution: A Critical Examination of The Structure of Evolutionary Theory," Studies in the History and Philosophy of the Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (2004): 209-216.

"The Rise, Fall and Resurrection of Group Selection," Endeavour 29, no. 1 (2005): 43-47.

Nicholas Buchanan

E Haven Hawley)  

History of Science and Technology
108 Pillsbury Hall
0211
(Office:131 Shepherd Labs)
Tel: 612-626-7581
Fax: 612-625-3819 (Earth Sciences)
Email: nbuchana@umn.edu

Visiting Assistant Professor 2013-2016 academic years

Specialties: History of ecological restoration and the scientific, legal, and ethical ramifications of designing nature

I am a Visiting Assistant Professor this academic year in HSTM and thought I’d take this opportunity to introduce myself. I did my graduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Program in Science, Technology, and Society, where I wrote my dissertation on environmental conflicts over water resources, endangered species, and agriculture in the Klamath Basin in Oregon and California. I was particularly interested in the role of experts in the earth and ecological sciences in legal decision-making, as well as the problematic question of expert disagreement in environmental policy. My current research looks at the history of ecological restoration and the scientific, legal, and ethical ramifications of—quite literally—designing nature.

Michel Janssen
(pictured in Einstein's tub)

Professor Michael Janssen (in Einstein's tub)

History of Science & Technology
148 Tate Laboratory of Physics
0331
(Office: Room 354B)
Tel: 612-624-5880
Email: janss011@umn.edu
www.tc.umn.edu/~janss011/

Specialties: history of modern physics, relativity and quantum revolutions, Einstein, philosophy of science.

I am a historian of physics studying conceptual developments in the late 19th and early 20th century. I got a Master's in theoretical physics at the University of Amsterdam (1988) and a Ph.D. in History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh (1995). I wrote my dissertation on the emergence of special relativity, paying special attention to the role of my countryman, H. A. Lorentz. I then worked for several years for the Einstein Papers Project, annotating various documents (published papers, research manuscripts, and correspondence) related to the genesis of general relativity. I have written extensively on the history of both special and general relativity. In special relativity, my main interest has been the transition from Newtonian particle mechanics to relativistic continuum mechanics. In general relativity, my focus has been on Einstein's struggle to find satisfactory gravitational field equations and on his quest to eliminate absolute motion and bsolute space (-time) from physics. More recently, I have turned to the history of quantum theory, looking specifically at the transition from quantum dispersion theory to matrix mechanics. Guiding my research in general are broader philosophical questions about scientific methodology and scientific explanation. I have long been interested in making the results of my work accessible to larger audiences. I have been offering a Freshman seminar called "Einstein for Everyone" and I am co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to Einstein.

Selected publications:
The Genesis of General Relativity. Vols. 1 and 2. Einstein's Zurich Notebook. With John D. Norton, Jürgen Renn, Tilman Sauer, and John Stachel (Berlin: Springer, 2006, forthcoming).

"On the Verge of Umdeutung in Minnesota: John van Vleck and the Correspondence Principle." With Anthony Duncan. Preprint available electronically at <philsci-archive.pitt.edu>.

"From Classical to Relativistic Mechanics: Electromagnetic Models of the Electron." With Matthew Mecklenburg. Pp. 65-134 in Interactions: Mathematics, Physics and Philosophy, 1860-1930, eds. V. F. Hendricks et al. (Berlin: Springer, 2006).

"Of Pots and Holes: Einstein's Bumpy Road to General Relativity." Annalen der Physik 14 (2005) Supplement 58-85.

"COI Stories: Explanation and Evidence in the History of Science." Perspectives on Science 10 (2002): 457-522.

Susan D. Jones


Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
100 Ecology Building
6098
(Office: Room 508)
Tel: 612-624-9636
Fax: 612-624-6777 (EEB)
www.cbs.umn.edu/eeb/faculty/JonesSusan

HST Director
108 Pillsbury Hall
0211
(Office: 133 Shepherd Labs)
Tel: 612-625-3838
Email: jone0996@umn.edu

Director of HST Program

Specialties: history of biomedical sciences, history of life sciences, historical ecology of disease, role of science in mediating human-animal interactions over time.

I am a historian of the modern biomedical and life sciences, with specialization in the historical ecology of disease, comparative and veterinary medicine, and environment and health. I am a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (University of Illinois) and completed my Ph.D. in History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania (1997). Prior to coming to Minnesota, I was a faculty member in the Department of History at the University of Colorado (Boulder); I also spent three terms as a Visiting Scholar at Cambridge University (UK). My early articles and first book, Valuing Animals , focused on topics including the cultural history of animal and zoonotic diseases; the development of comparative medicine; animal protection groups and the laboratory sciences; and how science mediated the changing relationships between humans and animals (both wild and domesticated). My current research interests focus on the historical ecology of zoonotic diseases. I am working on book-length projects on the history of anthrax and the history of bovine tuberculosis. Methodologically, I ask how human interpretations of disease have changed over time, how disease-causing agents have changed their ecology over time, and how the two have affected each other. I teach courses in the history of gender and science; the history of ecology and environmental history; history of biology and the life sciences; and the historical ecology of disease.

Selected Publications:
Valuing Animals: Veterinarians and Their Patients in Modern America (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003).

"Body and Place," Environmental History 10 (2005): 47-49.

"Mapping a Zoonotic Disease: Anglo-American Efforts to Control Bovine Tuberculosis Before World War I," Osiris 19 (2004): 133-148.

"Scientific Debates and Popular Beliefs: A Historical Study of Bovine Tuberculosis," Argos: Bulletin van het Veterinair Historisch Genootschap 27 (2002): 313-318.

"Becoming a Pest: Prairie Dog Ecology and the Human Economy in the Euroamerican West," Environmental History 4 (1999): 531-552.

"Framing Animal Disease: Housecats with Feline Urological Syndrome, Their Owners, and Their Doctors," Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 52 (1997): 202-235.

Sally Gregory Kohlstedt

Professor Sally Gregory Kohlstedt

Earth Sciences
108 Pillsbury Hall
0211
(Office: 204B Pillsbury Hall)
Tel: 612-624-9368
Fax: 612-625-3819(Earth Sciences)
www1.umn.edu/scitech
www.teachingchildrenscience.com

Acting Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Education, Sept. 2013-Aug. 2014
Sabbatical Leave 2014-2015 academic year

(2013-14: Office: 341 Johnston Hall)
Email: sgk@umn.edu

Specialties: Natural sciences in the United States; institutional and cultural contexts (museums)for science practice; women and gender in science

My research and teaching focus on analyzing the ways in which science intersects with culture, recognizing that much social change in recent centuries has been influenced by science and technology and that the issues that arise in science are often connected to contemporary social and economic forces. I previously taught at Simmons College and Syracuse University, and held visiting appointments at Cornell, the University of Munich, Melbourne University, and the University of Auckland. Interests in gender issues, I directed Women’s Studies at Syracuse and chaired the Feminist Studies Program at Minnesota. Among other offices, I have been President of the History of Science Society and served on the Board of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. My research concentrates on the history of science in American culture. I have written on the early development of scientific organizations, on the ways in which self-described amateurs participate in science, on the role of women in science, on the role of museums in the public understanding of science, on the gendered ways science often operates, and on the integration of science into school curricula. My most recent book reveals the way in which school children learned hands-on science in the early twentieth century. During the academic year 2014-15, I will be on sabbatical leave, spending some time in the fall at the Smithsonian Institution and, in the spring, at the Max Planck Institution for the History of Science in Berlin.

Selected Publications:
"Creative Niche Scientists: Women Educators in North American Museums, 1880-1930" Centaurus (May 2013), 153-174.

Science and the American Century: Readings from Isis edited with David Kaiser(Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013).

Teaching Children Science: Hands-On Nature Study in North America, 1890-1930 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010).

"Through Books to Nature: Texts and Objects in Nature Study Curricula," in Science in Print: Essays on the History of Science and the Culture of Print, ed. by Rima D. Apple, Gregory J. Downey, and Stephen L. Vaughn (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2012), pp. 156-179.

"Place and Museum Space: The Smithsonian Institution and the America West, 1850-1900" in Geographies of Nineteenth-Century Science, ed. by David Livingstone and Charles Withers (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011), pp. 399-437.

"A Better Crop of Boys and Girls: The School Gardening Movement, 1890s to the 1920s," History of Education Quarterly 48 (February 2008): 58-93.

Thomas Misa

Misa

Charles Babbage Institute
211 Andersen Library
7921
Tel: 612-624-5050
Fax: 612-625-8054 (CBI)
Email: tmisa@umn.edu
www.tc.umn.edu/~tmisa/

Director, Charles Babbage Institute

Specialties: Technology and modern culture, history of electronics and computing, historical methodologies

I am a historian specializing in the interactions of technology and modern culture. My undergraduate degree is from M.I.T. (1981) and my Ph.D. from University of Pennsylvania (1987). While I was at Illinois Institute of Technology (1987-2005), I was active in the international Tensions of Europe network and several collaborative research and book projects. I am now director of the Charles Babbage Institute, holding the ERA Land-Grant Chair in History of Technology with an appointment in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Research projects at CBI are presently supported by the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Department of Energy/Los Alamos National Laboratories. I am on the lookout for book projects in the history of computing for possible publication with MIT Press and ACM Books.

Selected Publications:
Digital State: The Story of Minnesota's Computing Industry (University of Minnesota Press, 2013)

Gender Codes: Why Women Are Leaving Computing (Wiley/IEEE-CS Press, 2010).

Urban Machinery: Inside Modern European Cities Co-edited with Mikael Hard (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2008).

Leonardo to the Internet: Technology and Culture from the Renaissance to the Present (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2nd edition 2011).

Modernity and Technology. Co-edited with Andrew Feenberg and Philip Brey (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2003).

A Nation of Steel: The Making of Modern America (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995).

ss ss
  Regular Faculty  |  Emeritus Faculty  |  Affiliated Faculty  |  Staff

Arthur Norberg

Professor Arthur Norberg


Roseville, MN
Email: norberg@cs.umn.edu

Professor Emeritus

Specialties: Relations among science, technology, and industry; the federal government's role in stimulating scientific and technological development; history of information processing; and the contexts for American technological development in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

In 2005 I became Professor Emeritus. Previously, I held the ERA Land-Grant Chair in History of Technology and was Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Charles Babbage Institute. An historian of science and technology, my research interests include the relations among science, technology, and industry; the federal government's role in stimulating scientific and technological development; history of information processing; and the contexts for American technological development in the 19th and 20th centuries. In several projects directed toward the enhancement of documentary materials for research in history of science and technology, I addressed a number of issues related to sources for historical study: theme-related archival development (history of electronics, history of computing); the nature of resources for historical studies (archives and manuscripts, business records, oral history); and historical research on topics in science and technology and on the way their results are used in society. Currently, I am preparing a study of computation in lunar prediction theory from the 17th to the 20th centuries.

Selected Publications:
Computers and Commerce (Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2005).

Transforming Computer Technology: Information Processing for the Pentagon, 1962-1986. With Judy E. O'Neill (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press).

"Table making in Astronomy," pp. 176-207 in The History of Mathematical Tables, ed. Martin Campbell-Kelly et al. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003).

"Punched-Card Machinery and the Spread of Mechanical Computation," Technology and Culture 31 (1990): 753-779.

"The Shifting Interests of the United States Government in the Development and Diffusion of Information Technology since 1943," in Information Technology Policy: Global Perspectives, ed. Richard Coopey (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).

Robert W. Seidel

Chemical Engineering & Material Science
151 Amundson Hall
0531
Fax: 612-626-7246(CEMS)
Email: rws@umn.edu

Professor Emeritus

Specialties: History of physical sciences and related technologies - 19th and 20th centuries.

I received my M.A. and Ph.D. in the History of Science from the University of California Berkeley. I am presently in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science. Previously, I held the ERA Land-Grant Chair in History of Technology and was Director of the Charles Babbage Institute at the University of Minnesota. I have also directed the Bradbury Science Museum of the Los Alamos National Laboratory and conducted research in the History of Engineering Program at Texas Tech University. I teach and investigate the history of science and technology in the 19th and 20th centuries, ranging from industrial chemistry to modern particle accelerators, computers, and high-energy lasers. I am currently working on a study of the application of computing to science in federal laboratories, a history of technology transfer, and the history of chemical engineering. My other interests include history of science in museums, and the history of military technology.

Selected Publications:
A History of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Vol. 1. Lawrence and His Laboratory (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990).

Los Alamos and the Making of the Atomic Bomb (Los Alamos: Otowi Press, 1995).

"Golden Anniversaries: The 50th Anniversaries of National Labs," Osiris 14 (2000): 187-202.

"The National Laboratories of the Atomic Energy Commission in the early Cold War," Historical Studies in the Physical and Biological Sciences 32 (2001): 145-162.

"Government and the Emerging Computer Industry," pp. 189-202 in From 0 to 1: An Authoritative History of Modern Computing, eds. Atsushi Akera and Frederik Nebeker (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002).

Alan Shapiro

Professor Alan Shapiro

History of Science & Technology
148 Tate Laboratory ofPhysics (Office: Room 231)
0331
Tel: 612-624-5770
Fax: 612-624-4578(Physics)
Email: ashapiro@physics.umn.edu
www.physics.umn.edu/people/ashapiro.html

Professor Emeritus

Specialties: history of physicalscience, Isaac Newton, history of optics, Scientific Revolution.

I am a historian of the physical sciences who works in the period from the Scientific Revolution through the early 19th century, and I am particularly interested in the history of optics and in the historical development of scientific methodology and experimental practice. I received my Ph.D. in the history of science and medicine from Yale University and wrote my dissertation on the development of the wave theory of light in the 17th century. My work has focused on Newton and his optical research, and I am the editor of The Optical Papers of Isaac Newton. The history of color theory and the historical interaction of art, science, and technology also interest me, and I teach a course on that. I have been a visiting member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and a Guggenheim Fellow, and I am also Vice President of the International Academy of the History of Science. Currently I serve on the editorial boards of many of the leading journals in my research area, such as Archive for History of Exact Sciences, Centaurus, Early Science and Medicine, and Nuncius.

Selected Publications:
The Optical Papers of Isaac Newton, Volume 1: The Optical Lectures, 1670-1672 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984).

Fits, Passions, and Paroxysms: Physics, Method, and Chemistry and Newton's Theories of Fits of Easy Reflection and Colored Bodies (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984).

"Artists' Colors and Newton's Colors," Isis 85 (1994): 600-630.

"The Gradual Acceptance of Newton's Theory of Light and Color, 1672-1727," Perspectives on Science 4 (1996): 59-140.

"Newton's Optics and Atomism," pp. 227-255 in The Cambridge Companion to Newton, eds. I. Bernard Cohen and George Smith (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

"Newton's 'experimental philosophy'," Early Science and Medicine 9 (2004): 185-217.

Roger H. Stuewer

Professor Emeritus Roger Stuewer

History of Science & Technology
148 Tate Laboratory of Physics (Office: Room 231)
0331
Tel: 612-624-5770
Fax: 612-624-4578(Physics)
Email: rstuewer@physics.umn.edu
www.physics.umn.edu/people/rstuewer.html

Professor Emeritus

Specialties: History of quantum mechanics, history of nuclear physics.

I am a historian of modern physics whose interests include the history of quantum mechanics and nuclear physics in their institutional and cultural settings and the role of the history of physics in physics teaching. I received my Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1968 and became Professor Emeritus at the University of Minnesota in 2000. I also taught at Boston University, held a research appointment at Harvard University, and was a visiting professor at the Universities of Munich, Vienna, Graz, and Amsterdam. I was cofounder and coeditor of the journal Physics in Perspective, am editor of the Resource Letters of the American Journal of Physics, and serve on the editorial boards of other leading journals. I am a member of the Program Committee of the Vienna International Summer University. I have served as secretary of the History of Science Society, chair of the Forum on the History of Physics (FHP) of the American Physical Society (APS), FHP Councilor of the APS, chair of the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Advisory committee on History of Physics, and chair of the Section on History and Philosophy of Science of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). I have been a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer and an APS Centennial Speaker. I received Distinguished Service Citations from the Institute of Technology of the University of Minnesota and the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT). I have been elected as a Fellow of the AAAS, the APS, and the AAPT. I was awarded the 2013 APS-AIP Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics and the 2014 Distinguished Alumni Award of the Department of Physics of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Selected Publications:
The Compton Effect: Turning Point in Physics (New York: Science History Publications, 1975).

Nuclear Physics in Retrospect (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1979).

"Artificial Disintegration and the Cambridge-Vienna Controversy," pp. 239-307 in Observation, Experiment, and Hypothesis in Modern Physical Science, eds. Peter Achinstein and Owen Hannaway (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1985).

"The Origin of the Liquid-Drop Model and the Interpretation of Nuclear Fission," Perspectives on Science 2 (1994): 39-92.

"Historical Surprises," Science and Education 15 (2006): 521-530.

"The Seventh Solvay Conference: Nuclear Physics, Intellectual Migration, and Institutional Influence" (forthcoming).

ss ss
  Regular Faculty  |  Emeritus Faculty  |  Affiliated Faculty  |  Staff
Tulley Long

Long  

History of Science & Technology
108 Pillsbury hall
0211
(Office: 152 B Shepherd Labs)
Email: tulley@umn.edu

Adjunct Faculty

Specialties: History of biology and biomedicine, stress physiology and biochemistry, the science of biological rhythms.

I am a historian of biology and biomedicine. Originally from Oregon, I earned a Master's degree in the History of Science from Oregon State University in 2005 after receiving a double BS in microbiology and environmental science and working as a molecular biologist at the same institution. I received my Ph.D. in the History of Science from the Johns Hopkins University in 2011.

My dissertation, entitled “Constituting the Stress Response: Hormones, Institutions and Laboratory Practices in America, 1930-1955,” is an examination of research on the physiology of stress in the years surrounding the Second World War. By following the work of endocrinologists, physiologists, and biochemists, which sought to elucidate the exact hormonal mechanisms by which the body responds to changes and challenges in its environment, the dissertation analyzes the development of the hormonal understanding of the stress response and the ways in which scientists deployed this knowledge toward military and civilian problems of stress in Cold War America. Beyond the science of stress, my research interests include a broad swath of twentieth century biology and biomedicine, including the phenomena of bioluminescence and biological rhythms, ecology and environmental science, population science and policy, and urban ecology and public health.

Jeanette E. Simmonds

 

Geography, Environment, and Society
414 Social Sciences
7163A
(Office: 152 B Shepherd Labs)
Tel: 612-625-0133
Email: jsimmond@umn.edu

Adjunct Faculty

Specialties: History of biology, symbiosis, and plant-microbe interactions, sustainability, ethics, multidisciplinary education, interdisciplinarity and research methods.

I am an ethnographic historian of the life sciences, with particular interest in the history and culture of scientific communities and their knowledge production practices. My passion is Biological Nitrogen Fixation research—a multidisciplinary field where scientists study the symbiosis between legumes (beans) and rhizobia (soil bacteria), a vital node in the nitrogen cycle. In addition to archival research, I work with scientists to narrate rich descriptions of their lives, work, communities, and ethical practices, thereby producing empirical data for historical analysis.

My undergraduate focus on biology and sociology led to graduate study in history and anthropology of science and structuralist/post-structuralist theory. After teaching and research post-docs at Cornell University and The Centre for Society and the Life Sciences (NLDS), and adjunct teaching in the Twin Cities area, I joined the University of Minnesota’s Department of Geography, Environment, and Society (GES), where I advise students studying biological, environmental, and health sciences and several subfields of geography. My work with undergraduate students engaged in multidisciplinary programs where science, environment, health, ethics, place, and culture intersect has been another rewarding turn in my career path.

Mary M. Thomas

Thomas  

History of Science & Technology
108 Pillsbury Hall
0211
(Office: Diehl Hall, Room 511A)
Tel: 612-624-4416
Email: thom0209@umn.edu

Adjunct Faculty

Specialties: history of technology, scientific instrumentation, military technology, social institutions of science and technology, U.S. History, particularly 1750-1865.

I am an historian of technology specializing in military technology, military culture, and the growing associations of the military and science in the 1650-1865 period. My undergraduate degree in Physics is from Hamilton College (1985), followed by an M.A. in History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Notre Dame (1988), and my Ph. D. from the Program in History of Science and Technology at the University of Minnesota (2002). My thesis title was, "Science, Military Style: Fortifications, Science, and the United States Army Corps of Engineers, 1802-1861," which focused primarily on the careers of army engineers Jonathan Williams and Joseph Gilbert Totten and the development of defense works along the eastern seaboard of the United States. In between education episodes, I did a study of the Block Island, RI, Southeast Light for the Historic American Building Record, and worked for several years as the Assistant Curator of the Adler Planetarium's collection of antique scientific instruments in Chicago. My adjunct teaching of the large History of Technology survey classes at the University of Minnesota has me working on new ways to convey material and actively engage students in large classroom settings. Some current areas of interest for me are the science and technology of textiles and how technology influences the design of industrial and domestic spaces. I also work part-time as the office administrator for the Program in the History of Medicine at the University of Minnesota. When not teaching or working at the university, much of my time is spent with my two daughters and their involvement with competitive Irish dancing.

ss ss
  Regular Faculty  |  Emeritus Faculty  |  Affiliated Faculty  |  Staff

Barbara Eastwold

Barbara Eastwold, Program Administrator


History of Science & Technology
108 Pillsbury Hall (Office: Room 220B)
0211
Tel: 612-624-7069
Fax: 612-625-3819 (Earth Sciences)
Email: eastw002@umn.edu

Program Administrator

I have been with the program since 1997. I enjoy the wide variety of tasks my job entails, especially the chance to work with graduate students and faculty of diverse interests. I received my BA from St. Olaf College in French and Physical Education. Prior to working at the University of Minnesota, I taught sixth through twelfth grade girls physical education and coached girls athletics, developed and produced printed materials, and was a residential real estate appraiser. When not at work, I enjoy walking, gardening, and reading.

Black border for page.
Black border for page.
 
© 2001 University of Minnesota
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.
Comments, questions to: HST@umn.edu
Updated: August 18, 2014
(Return to HST Home page)